(   )
                          (    )
                           (    )
                          (    )
                            )  )
                           (  (                  /\
                            (_)                 /  \  /\
                    ________[_]________      /\/    \/  \
           /\      /\        ______    \    /   /\/\  /\/\
          /  \    //_\       \    /\    \  /\/\/    \/    \
   /\    / /\/\  //___\       \__/  \    \/
  /  \  /\/    \//_____\       \ |[]|     \
 /\/\/\/       //_______\       \|__|      \
/      \      /XXXXXXXXXX\                  \
        \    /_I_II  I__I_\__________________\
               I_I|  I__I_____[]_|_[]_____I
               I_II  I__I_____[]_|_[]_____I
               I II__I  I     XXXXXXX     I
            ~~~~~"   "~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Fri, 18 Jan 2019

Comments on Perl

Ratfactor talks about learning Perl [0][1] - the language I know best and one that has proven immensely useful to me over the years in my IT career as a network jockey, developer, and sysadmin. Perl has a bad rap of late, it had its heyday in the late 90's and early 2000's, but now it seems to be less popular than Python as a general-purpose scripting language. I see nothing wrong with using Perl if it gets the job done. Many of the criticisms of Perl are still founded in the late 90's boom when there really was some horrific Perl written and distributed (Matt's script archive was one of the worst offenders), but those days are long gone and Modern Perl [2] as it's known is quite a different beast. Ratfactor mentions 'Minimal Perl' - a great book that is still on my bookshelf and a great read for any Unix aficionado who likes to fiddle with sed, awk, find and the like. Give Perl a try!

posted at: 10:01 | path: / | permalink | awk, modern-perl, perl, sed