(   )
                          (    )
                           (    )
                          (    )
                            )  )
                           (  (                  /\
                            (_)                 /  \  /\
                    ________[_]________      /\/    \/  \
           /\      /\        ______    \    /   /\/\  /\/\
          /  \    //_\       \    /\    \  /\/\/    \/    \
   /\    / /\/\  //___\       \__/  \    \/
  /  \  /\/    \//_____\       \ |[]|     \
 /\/\/\/       //_______\       \|__|      \
/      \      /XXXXXXXXXX\                  \
        \    /_I_II  I__I_\__________________\
               I_I|  I__I_____[]_|_[]_____I
               I_II  I__I_____[]_|_[]_____I
               I II__I  I     XXXXXXX     I
            ~~~~~"   "~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Sat, 18 Jan 2014

2600 Magazine's Ebooks

I've been a subscriber to 2600 magazine for about four years, and while the technical content is of varying quality, I enjoy reading the opinions, letters, 'hacker perspectives' columns and fiction. I also like reading the older 2600 magazines - from the 80s. This is when I got my start in computing, so there is definitely a bit of nostalgia there, but I also enjoy reading about the computing history of that time.

One of the things 2600 is doing right is that they are selling their older issues as part of annual archives, DRM-free, in multiple formats and at a reasonable price [0]. Electronic subscriptions via the Kindle are priced much less than the print issues. I know, it sounds almost unbelievable. Why don't more legacy publishers do this with their out-of-print backlists? What are they afraid of? Apparently, making money _and_ pleasing their customers. I guess they could never imagine both.

posted at: 12:37 | path: / | permalink | 2600, ebooks, magazines